Bernie Sanders Plans to Raise Taxes on the Wealthy to 90%

Bernie Sanders Plans to Raise Taxes on the Wealthy to 90%

Yes, you read that correctly. In an interview with CNBC, Bernie Sanders went on the record as supporting this radical notion.

While dining – in what seems to be a very elegant restaurant – he dogmatically turns against the high earners in this country. As a support to this outlandish beliefs, he turns to President Dwight D. Eisenhower and says:

“When radical, socialist Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, I think the highest marginal tax rate was something like 90 percent.”

It’s amazing how the left is quick to throw around the idea that the right is “radical,” especially while citing (and supporting) views like this.

Admittedly, the above statement is vague at best. When challenged on this idea, it’s followed with an equally vague remark about the lack of a formalized tax plan. But one thing that is quite clear is where Sanders stands on the matter.

After citing the views of President Eisenhower, the interviewer followed up by asking “When you think about something like 90 percent, you don’t think that’s obviously too high?”
To no surprise, Sanders responded:

“No. What I think is obscene, when you have the top one-tenth of one percent owning almost as much as the bottom 90.”

The Dangers of Peter Pan Syndrome

The land of opportunity.

Once upon a time, America was known as a place where you can come and build the dream if you were willing to work hard. Unfortunately, this type of take from the rich to give to the poor attitude seeks to ruin the longstanding American Dream.

The inspiring dream of infinitely rewarding the merits of a hard worker has turned into a nightmare. Now, all you have to do is show up and someone will give it to you.

Peter Pan syndrome, instant gratification, laziness… Whatever you want to call it, the verdict is clear: Punishing the rich for accomplishing the dream will eventually destroy the dream altogether. After all, why work hard and reach high ambitions if all it does is fund those who haven’t? The logic is flawed at best.

Uncovering the Truth About Tax Payers

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve likely heard it 20+ times: lower incomes feel like they pay too much and the elite wealthy pay too little. The tune is sung so often it feels like the anthem of the entire campaign from the left.

However, when you look at the statistics, do things add up? It doesn’t seem that way.

Let’s take a look at CNBC’s own reports. In terms of individual taxes, the bottom 40% of wage earners pay a whopping negative 9% of the accumulated taxes. Meanwhile, the top 40% of wage earners – aka, those who are “greedy” and “pay too little” – pay 106%.

Of course, the only logical explanation is that top earners need to increase their 106% to 109% to completely make up for the lack of contribution from lower earners. Because that’s fair, right?

Why the Wealthy Should Feel Concerned

After the scandal released with Hillary Clinton’s unfavorable activities, Bernie Sanders rose from complete obscurity. He now leads the way in many polls, including the recent mock election at Western Illinois University.

This system has predicted the winning president with 100% accuracy since 1975.

Any prediction has a large room for error, so concerned conservatives shouldn’t give up yet. However, these types of occurrences must work to ignite a passion for politics in 2016. It’s not enough to just get upset by radical tax ideas from the left. In order to avoid the chaos, we’ve got to get serious about supporting the right candidate for the American people.

Not only does your pocketbook depend on it, but the entirety of the American Dream may depend on it.

How do you feel about these promises of increased taxes? Do you think that this type of strategy encourages or hinders the American Dream? And, perhaps most importantly, what are you going to do about it? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

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